EAGE E-Lecture: Watching Gas Move: Seismic 4D Reservoir Monitoring of… by André Gerhardt
Pubblicato il 9 Dic 2019

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EAGE – NEAR SURFACE GEOSCIENCE 2022

On behalf of the EAGE Near Surface Geoscience Division, I cordially invite you to attend the Near Surface Geoscience Conference & Exhibition to be held in Belgrade, Serbia from 18-22 September 2022.

We are pleased to announce that after our successful virtual conference in 2020 and our first ever hybrid in Bordeaux in 2021, we will return in-person to Belgrade and host it for the first time there. For the NSG2022, we’ll introduce the first of its kind or rebranded 3rd Conference on Airborne, Drone and Robotic Geophysics along with the 28th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, and the 4th Conference on Geophysics for Mineral Exploration and Mining in this attractive region of Europe.

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29th “GUSTAVO SCLOCCHI AWARD” CEREMONY

The Gustavo Sclocchi Award is a joint initiative between EAGE, SPE Italia, Society of Petroleum Engineers – Italian Section and Assorisorse, an Italian Sustainable Energy & Resources Industry Association to reward excellent university graduates in energy related disciplines.

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EAGE E-Lecture: Watching Gas Move: Seismic 4D Reservoir Monitoring of the Pluto Gas Field, North West Shelf of Australia (by André Gerhardt)

This E-Lecture: “Watching Gas Move: Seismic 4D Reservoir Monitoring of the Pluto Gas Field, North West Shelf of Australia”, whilst Seismic 4D monitoring is a mature and established technology commonly used in the reservoir management of oil fields, not much has been published on its use for monitoring gas fields. In this presentation I describe in detail the various steps undertaken in the feasibility studies that underpinned the 4D seismic monitoring of the Pluto Gas Field in the North West Shelf of Australia. I also present some of the results of the first monitor survey which show remarkable similarity with the expectations from the feasibility studies. We postulate that the production-related (pressure and saturation) effects are much easier to predict and quantify when sufficient aquifer support is present.